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The Teachers College of Indianapolis 



Twenty-ninth Year 

1910-1911 



O 




THE WILLIAM N. JACKSON MEMORIAL BUILDING 
The Teachers College of Indianapolis 



Twenty-ninth Year of the 
Teachers College of Indianapolis 



19104911 

accredited by the indiana state board of 

education in classes a, b and c, 

June 21, 1907. 



THE WILLIAM N, JACKSON MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Twenty-Third and Alabama Streets 
= INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/yearofteachersc1011teac 



Board of Trustees and Advisory Board of the Indianapolis 
Free Kindergarten and Children's Aid Society 

1910-1911. 

PRESIDENT, 
Mrs. John H. Holliday. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

Mrs. John W. Kern, Mrs. H. H. Hanna, Mrs. Charles 

Schurmann, Mrs. J. H. Byers. 

RECORDING SECRETARY, 
Mrs. G. A. Schnull. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY, 
Mrs. James O. Henderson. 

TREASURER. 

Mrs. H. S. Tucker. 
Mrs. J. B. Elam, Mrs. Herman Munk, 

Mrs. Eddy M. Campbell, Mrs. Frank A. Morrison, 

Mrs. Meredith Nicholson, Mrs. Ferdinand Mayer, 

Mrs. T. A. Randall, Mrs. J. H. Taylor. 

Mrs. W. E. Hay ward, Mrs. Clemens Vonnegnt, 

Mrs. James H. Baldwin, 

Member Emeritus — Mrs. George W. Hufford. 

ADVISORY BOARD. 

Rev. M. L. Haines, Mr. A. C. Ayres, 

Mr. W. H. H. Miller, Mr. Thomas H. Spann, 

Mr. C. N. Kendall, Mr. Robert J. Aley, 

Mr. John P. Frenzel, Mr. Hugh J. McGowan. 

Mr. Louis H. Levey. 

Member Emeritus — Mr. George Merritt. 



Faculty and Officers of Administration of the Teachers 
College of Indianapolis. 

ELIZA A. BLAKER, President. 
Philosophy of Education. 

LOIS G. HUFFORD, A. M. 

English Composition, Literature, History, French. 

BLANCHE G. MATHEWS, Registrar. 

JESSIE M. GOODWIN, Dean. 
Literature. 

LAURA BARNEY ROYSE. 

Domestic Science and Sociology. 

EMMA COLBERT, Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity. 
Principles of Teaching, Primary Methods. 

EDITH D. SURBEY, A. B. 
Primary Methods. 

CHARLOTTE E. P. GARDINER. 

Psychology, History of Education, Froebel's Phil- 
osophy. 



Biology, Physiography. 
GEORGE W. HUFFORD, A. M. 

Director of Latin and German. 
GLADYS L. CRAWFORD, A. B. Vassar College. 

Mathematics, History, and Civil Government. 
PROF. J. H. WOODRUFF. 

Penmanship. 
JULIA FRIED WALKER. 

Methods for Rural Schools, Mathematics and 

School Organization. 



Physics and Chemistry. 
HARRIET E. TURNER, M. D. 

The Teaching of Sanitation and Preventive Medi- 
cine in the Public Schools. 
MARTHA B. CRILEY. 

Public School Music. 
RODA E. SELLECK. 

Public School Drawing. 
RUTH PATTERSON. 

Clay Modeling, Drawing, and Construction Work. 
ANNA FERN. 

Textile and Fiber Work, Public School Sewing. 
GRACE M. NOURSE. 

Kindergarten Methods. 
HELEN WALLICK. 

Kindergarten Methods. 

6 



EDITH 1). WACHTSTETTER. 

Stories and Games. 
ALICE BUCHANAN. 

Bookbinding and Construction Work. 
JENNIE RAY ORMSBY, Emerson School of Expression, 

Boston. 

Readme and Expression, and Physical Culture. 
MARY ECKMAN, Secretary. 
ALMA M. BECKMAN and EDNA BROWN FLEMING. 

Assistants in Administration Department. 
SADIE JENNINGS, Clerk. 
EDITH FOUNTAIN, Librarian. 

Josephine Mcdowell. 

Pianist, and Assistant in Department of Music. 
GRACE E. DeVERE. 

Assistant in Story and Kindergarten Methods. 

TUTORS. 
MARY SCHELL. 

Assistant in Construction Work. 
OPAL HAWKINS. 

Assistant in Primary Methods. 
FELLOWSHIPS— Alice Puddefoot, 

Elizabeth Downhour, 
Hazel Lapinska. 

LECTURE COURSES FOR SEASON 1910-1911. 

WM. N. HAILMANN. 

Educational Problems. 
GEORGE H. TAPY, A. M., Head of Educational Depart- 
ment, Wabash College. 

Course of five lectures on "The Educative 

Process. ' ' 
STANLEY COULTER, Ph. D., Dean Department of 

Science, Purdue University. 

Monthly lectures in Biology. 
W. W. CRILEY, D. D. 

A course of ten lectures on "Ethics." 
MARIE RUEF HOFER. 

Kindergarten, Playground and Folk Songs and 

Games. 



Calendar, 1910=1911 

September 1, Thursday — First Faculty Meeting. 

September 7, Wednesday — Registration and assignment 
of work — all departments. 

September 8, Thursday — Instruction begins. 

September 12, Monday — Private Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary Grades re-open. 

September 19, Monday — Free Kindergartens and Pri- 
mary Practice Classes re-open. 

October 20, Thursday — Mothers' Clubs Classes and 
Girl's Friendly Clubs re-open. 

October 28, Friday — Domestic Training Courses re-open. 

November 1, Tuesday — Normal Classes for Mothers re- 
open. 

November 3, Thursday — Sunday School Workers ' Classes 
re-open. 

November 24 to 28 — Thanksgiving recess. 
December 22 to January 3 — Christmas Recess. 
January 4, Wednesday — New students enter for mid- 
year classes. 

February 23, Thursday — Mid-year Commencement. 

Five groups in Class A work will be formed as follows: 

On March 15, April 12, May 17, May, 24, and June 1st. 
Class B will be formed on March 15 and April 12. 
Students may enter for Classes A and B on October 5. 

On March 15, April 5, April 12, May 3, May 17, May 
24, June 1, June 15, and July 5, special classes are formed 
for experienced teachers for six and twelve weeks' study. 
Experienced teachers desiring twelve weeks' work cannot 
enter later than June 1, unless such teachers return when 
the College re-opens in September. 

May 6, Saturday — Domestic Training Schools close. 

May 27, Saturday — Annual Free Kindergarten Play 
Fest. 

May 31, Wednesday — Free Kindergartens and Primary 
Classes close. 

June 9, Private Kindergarten and Primary Classes close. 

June 18, Sunday — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 19, Monday — Class Day Exercises. 

June 22, Thursday — Commencement. 

June 22 — Alumnae Meeting and Banquet. 



EXPENSES. 

Kindergarten Department. 
A Limited number of free scholarships may be granted 
each term in this department. The number of full free 
scholarships lias been limited to twenty-five per year. 

Partial Scholarships may be obtained for $25 per year 
and $10 Entrance Pees for each year. 

Tuition for other students, per year $60.00 

Entrance fee, first year, paid scholarship 10.00 

Entrance fee, first year, free scholarship (full) 15.00 

Entrance fee, second, third and fourth years res- 
pectively, paid scholarship 10.00 

Entrance fee, second, third and fourth years re- 
spectively, free scholarship 10.00 

Graduation fee 3.00 

Diploma 3.00 

Tuition, Mothers' Classes, per term of 12 lessons. . . 6.00 
Tuition, Sunday School Workers' Classes, 15 lessons 7.50 
Tuition, Nursery Governesses' Classes, per term of 6 

months 25.00 

A Free Scholarship may be granted in the class for 
Nursery Governesses for one year's practice in the 
Free Kindergartens and the payment of $5.00 
entrance fees. 

Tuition, Nursery Maids' Classes, per term of 10 les- 
sons 2.50 

Tuition, Private Kindergarten, for children from 2 

to 6 years of age, per week 75 

(An additional charge of 2 5 cents per week will be made 
in the case of those children who reside more than five squares 
from the building, and for whom a Kindergartener is sent.) 

Tuition, Connecting Class, per week 75 

First year, Primary Grade 75 

Second and third year, Primary Grades 80 

SPECIAL ACCREDITED CLASSES. 

Tuition, Class A, 12 weeks 20.00 

Class B, 24 weeks 40.00 

Class C, 3 years' course, per year 60.00 

Tuition for six weeks' course 12.00 

Graduation fee, Class C 3.00 

Diploma, Class C (three years' course) 5.00 

Two-years' course for teachers of District and Town 

Schools, per year 60.00 

Graduation fee 3.00 

Diploma 3.00 

Entrance fees in the 2 and 3-year accredited courses : 

First year 10.00 



Second and third year, each 10.00 

Third and fourth years — Student-directors of 
Kindergartens — no tuition. Entrance fees. . . 10.00 

Students in regular departments are required to furnish 
their own books and materials, the cost of which need not 
exceed $20 for the entire course. One-half of the bill for 
books and materials is due on registration. Students in 
special courses may rent the necessary text-books. 

The Entrance Fees include library, locker, and laboratory 
fees. 

All fees are payable on registration. Tuition is payable 
semi-annually in advance. Should a student leave the 
College before the close of the term, fees are not returned. 

Teachers may enter for courses in manual work, with 
the addition of one elective subject. 

Tuition in this department for six weeks $15.00 

Public School Sewing — 6 weeks 15.00 

Public School Drawing — 6 weeks 15.00 

Public School Music— 6 weeks 15.0fr 

COMBINED COURSES. 

Any two of these special courses for six weeks .... $25.00 
Any two of these special courses for twelve weeks. . 35.00 
Any two of these special courses for twenty-four 

weeks 47.50 

CONDITIONS FOR ADMISSION. 

KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT. 

Applicants must be at least eighteen years of age, and 
must give satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 
They must pass a physical examination and bring a cer- 
tificate of health. Those who have completed commissioned 
high school, collegiate, or university courses are preferred. 
Experienced teachers, and those holding licenses to teach 
in the public schools of Indiana within the last three years 
are not required to pass the Kindergarten entrance exami- 
nation. 

Two classes are formed each year — one in September 
and one in January. 

Students from other Kindergarten Training Classes of 
good standing are accepted, and credit is given for all lines 
of lecture and manual work which meet the requirements 
of this school. 

Students who desire to teach in the public schools of In- 
diana must be graduates of commissioned or certified non- 
com missioned high schools, or pass the State Board of 
Examination for undergraduates. 

10 



POST-GRADUATE KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT. 

An applicant for admission to this department must hold 
a diploma from this College, or from one of equal standing, 
and must give evidence of qualifications for the work of 
supervision and of normal training. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR TEACHERS IN TRAINING FOR INDIANA 
STATE LICENSES. 

Experienced teachers, who desire to receive professional 
training with a view to obtaining licenses in Class A, B 
or C, as provided for under the law of Indiana, must have 
conformed to the requirements of said law, as printed 
below : 

Note — The Indiana General Assembly of 1906, enacted a law 
which divides all common school teachers of the State into 
three classes, known as "Class A," "Class B" and "Class C." 

Members of "Class A" are persons that have had no previous 
experience as teachers; such teachers must be graduates of 
commissioned or certified non-commissioned high schools, or 
have equivalent scholarship; must have had not less than 
twelve weeks' work in a professional school for the training 
of teachers, and hold a license of not less than twelve months. 

"Class B" includes all teachers that have had one year's 
experience. Such teachers are required to be graduates of 
commissioned or certified non-commissioned high schools, or 
have equivalent scholarship; to hold a license of not less than 
two years; to have had not less than twenty-four weeks' work 
in a professional school for the training of teachers, and to 
hold a success grade. 

To be a member of "Class C" a person must be a graduate 
of a commissioned or a certified non-commissioned high school, 
or have equivalent scholarship; hold a three years' license, or 
its equivalent; have had three years' successful experience, 
have a success grade, and be a graduate of a professional 
school for the training of teachers. 

PURPOSE AND HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT. 

The Teachers College of Indianapolis was organized 
in 1882, as a Normal School for the training of kinder- 
garteners and primary teachers, and to supply a teaching 
force for the free kindergartens of the city, all of which are 
under the direction of the Free Kindergarten Association. 

Since 1903, the school has occupied the William N. 
Jackson Memorial Building, which was erected for its use 
by the Free Kindergarten Association, and which is 
admirably adapted for efficient work. It is located on high 
open ground in the northern part of the city. It is sub- 
stantially built of brick and stone, comfortable, thoroughly 
sanitary, and completely equipped for all lines of work 
necessary for Normal training and practice. 

The Faculty has been increased to keep pace with the 

11 



growing demands upon the school for instruction in meth- 
ods of teaching in elementary grades, as well as in the 
kindergarten. 

Special classes are organized each year, for giving addi- 
tional training to those already teaching who may desire 
better preparation for their professional duties. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE. 

Primary classes are conducted in connection with several 
of the kindergartens; in these the teachers in training may 
practice under the supervision of experienced critic teach- 
ers, who are members of the Faculty. They have ample op- 
portunity for observation in the public schools of Indian- 
apolis, in the free and private kindergartens, and in the 
model primary school connected with the Teachers College. 
During the summer term, the graded school of the Indian- 
apolis Orphan Asylum is used for observation. The vaca- 
tion kindergartens and public playgrounds offer additional 
opportunities for study of child life. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

The regular curriculum consists of a two-years' course 
for Kindergartners, Primary and Elementary Teachers, 
and a post-graduate course of one year for those desiring 
to become supervisors. In addition to these, opportunity 
is offered to students, desiring supplementary work along 
any of the prescribed lines. 

A fourth year's course leading to degrees in the Science 
of Education may be taken by such students as give evi- 
dence of special proficiency and aptitude. This course will 
consist of advanced work in Pedagogics, Experimental Psy- 
chology, Literature, etc. This course is also for those who 
desire to do Normal Training Work. 

The additional academic work required for those pre- 
paring to teach in the public schools of Indiana will be in 
the hands of experienced instructors. 

REGULAR CURRICULUM FOR KINDERGARTNERS 
AND PRIMARY TEACHERS. 

(1) PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGICS.— A study 
of mind, and the laws of mental development, their rela- 
tion to nerve physiology, and their application to the peda- 
gogics of the kindergarten and elementary grades. 

(2) HISTORY OF EDUCATION.— A general survey 
of the evolution of education from the earliest historic 
times; its relation to modern methods and ideals. Also 
special lectures on the life of Frederick Froebel. 

(3) FROEBEL'S PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 

12 



— Aii interpretation of the mother-play, with supplemen- 
tary readings on ehild-nature. 

(4) GIFTS AND OCCUPATIONS.— A thorough ex- 
position of their history and value, with illustrations of 
their use, and individual experience in class direction. 

(5) STORIES. — Lectures on their sources and values, 
with special training in their composition and narration. 

(6) NATURE STUDY.— In this course attention is 
directed to the changing phenomena of the seasons as 
they pass ; close observation is made of animal, insect, and 
bird life; practical acquaintance is gained with trees and 
the growth of flowering plants and vegetables; suggestions 
are given as to the beautifying of the school grounds and 
the home. 

(7) VOICE CULTURE.— The course in voice culture 
will be adapted to the individual student. It embraces cor- 
rect mode of breathing; correct position of the vocal or- 
gans; articulation, pronunciation, phrasing, and correct 
deportment in the delivery of solo work. 

The aim of the vocal classes is to teach the rudiments 
of music, and the art of singing according to the present 
methods of teaching music in the public schools. Special 
attention is paid to rote song and chorus work, and part 
singing. 

(8) SONGS AND GAMES.— Regular practice in kin- 
dergarten and primary school songs, games, and rhythmic 
movements, supplemented by vocal training and gymnastics. 

(9) PHYSICAL CULTURE.— I. Exercise in a well- 
equipped gymnasium, including free-standing movements; 
fancy steps; use of Swedish apparatus; games of strength 
and skill; also lectures on the adaption of exercise to 
the various ages of children; hygiene and physiology. 
II. In this course mind and body are co-ordinated; the 
body is considered or trained as the expressive agent of 
being; exercises are given for developing health, poise, 
dignity of bearing, good presence, ease of manner, grace, 
symmetry, etc. A complete line of rhythmic work, including 
Gilbert Aesthetic dancing, is used for developing finer 
subtlety in the body. Attention is given to the individual 
defects with special adaptation to individual needs. Lec- 
tures on higher education of the body. 

(10) MANUAL WORK. — Drawing, painting, clay 
modeling, designing, paper folding, paper weaving, and 
all lines of kindergarten occupation work; also raffia and 
reed work, bead designing, elementary slojd, and simple 
lines of constructive work for the elementary grades. 

(11) PRIMARY SUBJECTS.— Lectures on language, 
number, reading, and all primary subjects; co-relation of 

13 



the kindergarten and the primary school; adaption of 
Froebelian principles of education to primary work ; nature 
work, etc. 

(12) SPECIAL LECTURES.— Lectures upon subjects 
of general culture or practical utility, and inspiration to 
the teacher 

(13) COMMON SCHOOL BRANCHES.— Arithmetic, 
spelling, geography, and penmanship are taught. 

(14) PRACTICE.— Each student is required to prac- 
tice, under supervision, in the Kindergartens and Domestic 
Training Schools of the Free Kindergarten system. Dur- 
ing the second year, she conducts a primary practice school 
for a limited term. She has opportunity to work in the 
Mothers' Department of the Kindergarten districts. Sys- 
tematic training in the making of kindergarten programs 
is connected with the practical experience. 

SUPLEMENTARY COURSE. 
Students who have had previous training, and who wish 
to supplement such work, may enter this course at any time 
of the school year. 

ACCESSORY COURSES. 

I. FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

The Teachers College now offers a two-years' course of 
study for teachers of younger children in Sunday Schools. 
The President of the College gives lectures, accompanied 
by illustration and practical example, in the skillful pre- 
sentation of Bible stories and other stories of ethical value ; 
on the choice of suitable pictures and wise explanation of 
the same; on child psychology, and such kindred subjects 
as tend to the bettering of Sunday School teaching. 

II. FOR MOTHERS AND OTHERS WHO HAVE THE CARE OF 
CHILDREN. 

For the aid and guidance of mothers, and any who may 
have children under their care, a special course has been 
planned. This will include a study of child nature; of 
Froebel's principles of education, especially his Mother- 
Play-Songs ; and practical work with such of his Gifts and 
Occupations as can best be utilized in the child 's daily home 
life. 

III. A COURSE IN DOMESTIC TRAINING. 

This course includes both theory and practice in every 
detail of housekeeping. Length of term, three months. 
Students may enter this class at any time during the year, 
iv. nurses' department. 

A Nurses' Class will be organized for giving training to 
the mothers' assistants in the care of their children. The 

14 



lessons include instructions on the right kind of plays for 
the nursery, on occupations, stories, and songs suitable for 
the little ones. 

V. PLAYGROUND WORK. 

This course comprises manual work, stories, games, and 
whatever will contribute to efficiency in the conduct of 
playgrounds for children. 

VI. SPECIAL SUMMER TERM WORK. 

(a.) A comprehensive course in Domestic Training, in- 
cluding cooking, sewing, care of dining and sleeping 
rooms, and whatever belongs to ordinary housekeeping. 

(b.) Graduates of other schools, and others who desire 
to do so, may receive special lessons in Manual Work, pro- 
vided they take also one regular elective subject. 

(c.) Lessons in Vocal Music will be given to any who 
may desire such a course. 

The coming year an attempt will be made to present to the 
students of Teachers' College a course in play, such as is 
given to professional directors of playgrounds. This 
course is under the direct supervision of Dr. Harriet E. 
Turner, who is a graduate of the Posse Normal 
School of Gymnastics, Boston ; a member of The Ameri- 
can Physical Education Association, and also of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. Dr. Turner's experience has been 
wide as a teacher of gymnastics, as well as a worker in the 
organized charities. 

There will be courses in Child Nature, Nature and Func- 
tion of Play, Social Conditions of the Neighborhood, Hy- 
giene and First Aid, Playground Movement, The Practical 
Conduct of Playgrounds, The Organization and Adminis- 
tration of Playgrounds. 

The courses in Child Nature and the Nature and Func- 
tion of Play are given by the Faculty of the school. The 
other five subjects will be taught by Dr. Turner. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL DRAWING 

FOR THE REGULAR AND SPECIAL COURSES. 

An acquaintance with the material used for drawing. 
Acquaintance with the material used for the Applied Arts. 

Landscape w T ork. 

The daily observation of, and the making of, landscapes 
for irregular masses in light and dark, and in color. 

The study of trees for name, form and public usefulness. 

Free brush work of leaves and flowers. 

Pictorial drawing of animals, birds and other animate 
forms. 

Figure drawing for action. 

15 



Color notes from Nature, textiles, prints for harmony 
of color. 

Type forms in their relation to object drawings, toys, etc. 

Simple construction and free-hand perspective. 

The study of design for lettering, stenciling, handwork, 
and other ornamental purposes. 

Talks upon Architecture and Applied Arts. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES. 

The library, which contains more than two thousand 
volumes, offers excellent facilities for reference in the 
various departments of study, and in general literature. 
Upon request, the librarian of the Public Library of In- 
dianapolis lends to the school whatever additional books 
are needed for special investigation in any department. 
A number of standard educational periodicals are taken 
regularly. 

GYMNASIUM. 

In the third floor of the building is a large, well-equipped 
gymnasium, with dressing-rooms, shower-baths, etc. Exer- 
cises in physical training are a regular feature of the 
course. 

NOTES. 

Pupils will be required to dress for gymnastics without 
corsets or restriction to free movement of the neck, chest, 
arms, waist and feet. Measurements for dress waist should 
be taken loosely while the lungs are fully inflated. The 
weight of all clothing should depend upon the shoulders. 
Shoes should have low heels, with broad ball and toe meas- 
urements. 

Bloomers of material like the school dress may be but- 
toned with the outer dress skirt to the dress waist (made 
suitable for street wear and loose enough for gymnastics), 
and the outer skirt removed for gymnastics. 

Students of this College are required to study the 
theory of Domestic Science, and to practice in the Domestic 
Training School and Slojd Classes, and to work in the 
Mothers' Departments of the kindergarten districts. 

The Secretary will, on application, select boarding places 
for the students. 

Not many graduates of this College are out of em- 
ployment. Good teachers will find no difficulty in se- 
curing positions. The demand is yearly increasing. The 
association can not obligate itself, however, to secure po- 
sitions for graduates. 

COURSES OF STUDY FOR ACCREDITED CLASSES. 
To meet the demands of those classes which are entered 

16 



under the requirements of the new Indiana law, the 
Teachers College has organized the following courses: 

COURSE FOR TEACHERS OF "CLASS A." 
(Twelve Weeks.) 

Edueational Psychology, with special reference to the 
needs of teachers of graded and district schools. 

Observation and Study in Training Schools, both graded 
and country. 

Methods of Instruction, adapted to graded and district 
schools. 

One term's work in any of the common branches or 
other subjects offered in the course for teachers of 
"Class C." 

Vocal Music, Penmanship, Drawing, or Manual Training. 

This course is organized especially for graduates of 
commissioned or certified non-commissioned high schools 
who have not taught, and who are, by law, after August 1, 
1908, required to have at least "twelve weeks" work in a 
school maintaining a professional course for the training 
of teachers" before teaching. Credits made may be ap- 
plied on any of the courses embracing the subjects pursued 
in this course. 

COURSE FOR TEACHERS OF "CLASS B." 

(Twenty-four Weeks.) 

Educational Psychology, with special reference to the 
needs of teachers of graded and district schools 

Twenty-four weeks 

Observation and Study in Training Schools, both 

graded and country Twelve weeks 

Methods of Instruction, adapted to graded and dis- 
trict schools Twelve weeks 

History of Education or School Organization and Ad- 
ministration Twelve weeks 

Two terms' work in any one or more of the common 
branches, or other subject or subjects offered in 
the course for teachers of "Class C." 
Vocal Music, Penmanship, Manual Training or Draw- 
ing Twelve weeks 

This course is organized especially for graduates of com- 
missioned or certified non-commissioned high schools who 
have had at least one year's experience as teachers, and 
who are by law, after August 1, 1908, required to have 
"at least twenty-four weeks' work in a school maintaining 
a professional course for the training of teachers." Cred- 
its made may be applied on any of the courses embracing 
the subjects pursued in this course. 

17 



COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF "CLASS C." 

(Three Years.) 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 

Arithmetic Twenty-four weeks 

Language, Grammar and Composition . . Twenty-four weeks 
U. S. History and Civil Government .. Twenty-four weeks 

Physiology and Hygiene Twelve weeks 

Oral Reading and Literature Twenty-four weeks 

Geography Twenty-four weeks 

Penmanship Twelve weeks 

Educational Psychology, with special reference to 

grade work Thirty-six weeks 

Principles and Mehods of Teaching .. Twenty-four weeks 
Observation and Practice in Training Schools 

Twenty-four weeks 

School Organization and Administration .... Twelve weeks 

History of Education Twelve weeks 

Manual Training and School Economics, adapted to 

all grades Twelve weeks 

Vocal Music Twelve weeks 

Drawing Twelve weeks 

Nature Study Twelve weeks 

Physical Culture Twenty-four weeks 

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS. 

Latin Three years 

German Three years 

Algebra One year 

Geometry One year 

Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry One year 

Physics Two years 

Chemistry Two years 

Botany Two years 

Zoology Two years 

English and American Literature Two years 

History Two years 

This course is organized for graduates of commissioned 
or certified non-commissioned high schools, and others of 
equivalent scholarship. 

A "credit" consists of twelve weeks' successful work in 
any subject. Thirty-eight credits are necessary for gradua- 
tion. 

At the end of two years' successful teaching after com- 
pleting this course, the Diploma will be awarded, which is 
by law equivalent to a life license to teach in Indiana. 

18 



COURSE FOR TEACHERS OF DISTRICT AND TOWN 
SCHOOLS. 

(Two Years.) 
Language, Grammar and Composition. .Twenty-four weeks 

Arithmetic Twenty-four weeks 

Oral Reading and Literature Twenty-four weeks 

Geography Twenty-four weeks 

U. S. History and Civil Government . . Twenty-four weeks 

Physiology and Hygiene Twelve weeks 

Vocal Music Twelve weeks 

Drawing Twelve weeks 

Principles and Methods of Teaching. .Twenty-four weeks 
Educational Psychology, with special reference to 

grade work Twenty-four weeks 

Observation and Practice in Training Schools, graded 

and country Twenty-four weeks 

Manual Training and School Economics adapted to 

all grades Twelve weeks 

Physical Culture — Two hours per week . Twenty-four weeks 

History of Education Twenty-four weeks 

Penmanship Twelve weeks 

Elective (from other courses) Twenty-four weeks 



Details of Departments 

ARTS AND CRAFTS. 

Drawing, when properly presented, becomes one of the 
most important factors in the education of the child. It 
brings the home to the school; makes the workman a phil- 
osopher, and opens the eyes of the child to the beauties of 
nature's secrets. 

The teacher needs (1) a knowledge of composition for 
selection and arrangement; (2) a knowledge of the 
principles, for tone balance and relation; (3) a knowledge 
of form for object, animal and life sketching; (4) a knowl- 
edge of design with which to add beauty to the busy work 
for the child; (5) a knowledge of simple perspective, by 
which the child learns how he sees the trees or the road in 
his walks; (6) a knowledge of landscape, for the mysteries 
of night and morning, sunset and noon; (7) a knowledge 
of story-telling for the creative imagination of the child; 
(8) a thorough knowledge of material possible to be used 
in the school-room. 

MUSIC. 

"Let the child hear music and learn to sing, and let him see 
the forms of what he has sung and thus learn musical no- 
tation." — Foresman. 

19 



I. The song as a basis for musical experience, interpre- 
tation and use of voice. 
II. The song as a basis for music sight reading — 

1. Rhythm. 

2. Tone relation. 

3. Metrical values. 

III. Music sight-reading — 

1. Ear training. 

2. Writing music. 

IV. Theory— 

1. Major and minor scales (relatives and 

tonic). 

2. Intervals. 

3. Triads. 

4. Chromatic effects. 
V. Biography and history — 

1. Famous musicians and compositions. 

2. The orchestra and musical instruments. 
VI. The voice— 

1. Classification. 

2. Its proper use. 
VII. Music, its division into — 

1. Primary grades. 

2. Grammar grades. 

3. High school. 

VIII. Psychology and pedagogy as applied to public 
school music. 
IX. Chorus and part-singing. 

Books used — The Modern Music Series. 

ENGLISH. 

The first two courses named are required. At least four 
other courses must be selected by candidates for a diploma 

from "Oli-iss C 1 '' 

I. ENGLISH USAGE— A study of the principles gov- 
erning correct use of English in sentences and 
paragraphs, together with regular practice in 
composition writing. 
II. A STUDY OF POETIC ART— The purpose of this 
course is to develop an intelligent appreciation 
of literature. It will include study of poetic dic- 
tion, metrical forms, aesthetic qualities, struc- 
tural forms, etc. It will be copiously illustrated 
by selections from English and American authors. 
III. ENGLISH PROSE MASTERPIECES— The ma- 
terial for this course will be selected from the 
writings of Bacon, Milton, Bunyan, Addison, 
Lamb, Macanlay, Carlyle, Emerson, Ruskin, Ar- 
nold, Lowell, and others. 

20 



IV-V. .SHAKESPEARE— The plays will be selected with 
the purpose of gaining an acquaintance with the 
wide range and the peculiar characteristics of 
the art of Shakespeare. The courses will be in- 
tmduced by lectures on the English Drama be- 
fore Shakespeare. 
VI. ENGLISH POETRY from Dryden to Wordsworth, 
with a study of the nature of the Romantic Re- 
vival. 
VII. Studies in Spenser, Milton and Tennyson. 
VIII. Studies in Shelley, Keats, and Browning. 
IX. Studies in American Literature. 
X. In the Third and Fourth Year Courses, there will 
be special studies in Homer, Dante, Goethe, and 
other world-classics. 
Note — A view of English Literature in its historical develop- 
ment will be given in connection with the different courses. 

HISTORY. 

For the present the work in History will be confined to 
that of England and America. It will be given by lectures, 
topical reading, note-books, and papers on assigned topics. 
I. AMERICAN HISTORY, from 1492 to 1783. 
II. The AMERICAN NATION, from 1783 to the pres- 
ent time. 

III. ENGLISH HISTORY, to 1603 A. D. 

IV. ENGLISH HISTORY, from 1603 A. D., to the pres- 

ent time. 

BOTANY. 

1. Elementary Botany. Morphology of plants; the life 
history of representatives of the main classes of plants; 
a careful study of the higher seed-plants, with experimental 
work in germination and related subjects. Students are 
expected to collect, identify, and preserve easily accessible 
forms. 

ZOOLOGY. 

The work in this subject will include studies in Elemen- 
tary and Systematic Zoology, laboratory investigation, and 
observation of such types of animal life as are within reach. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

The work in this course embraces: — 

1. A study of the more significant facts of Mathemat- 
ical and Physical Geography, special emphasis being given 
to the earth as a heavenly body, its motions, changes of 
seasons, etc. 

2. An intensive study of weather and climate. 

3. Commercial Geography; the effects of physical con- 

21 



ditions upon the commercial life of nations; methods of 
production of common articles of commerce; the leading 
trade routes, etc. 

4. Physiography ; a study of the origin and developmeDt 
of land forms; the nature of soils; the structure of the 
earth's crust, etc. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The courses in mathematics will include the usual 
branches of that science which are required in high schools 
and colleges. 



Syllabus 

METHODS IN PRIMARY TEACHING. 
I. The course of study. 

a. An organization of material from the child's 

point of view. 

b. A study of materials from the standpoint of 

development in the history of the race. 

c. The relation between the two. 

d. The teacher an important factor in assist- 

ing the child to an organization of his 
experience. 
II. Discussion of methods in teaching. 

a. Methods which have been used. 

b. Motives in teaching. 

c. Motor activity. Its relation to method. 

III. Discussion of method in special subjects — Language, 

Reading, Penmanship, Number, History, Geogra« 
phy, Nature Study, Manual Modifying work. 

1. Nature of the subject. 

2. Relation to other subjects — co-relation. 

3. Psychological value. 

4. Practical use. 

IV. Types of lessons. 

1. Development lesson. 

2. Drill Review. 

3. Telling lesson, etc. 
V. Writing of lesson plans. 

VI. Practice teaching. 

1. Observation. 

2. Study of children. 

3. Study of curriculum. 

4. Six-weeks' school-room practice. 
DIRECTORY OF SCHOOLS AND KINDERGARTENS. 

Teachers College, northeast corner of Alabama and 
Twenty-third streets. (Take Central avenue car to Twen- 
ty-third street.) 

22 



FREE KINDERGARTENS AND PRIMARY CLASSES. 

Eliza A. Blaker, Superintendent. 
Martha B. Criley, Supervisor Free Kindergartens. 
Emma Colbert, Supervisor Primary Grades. 
Julia Fried Walker, Supervisor of Rural School Observa- 
tions. 

No. 1. Arabella C. Peelle Free Kindergarten, No. 951 
W. Michigan street. Ethelyn Bishop, Di- 
rector. 

No. 2. Christamore Settlement House Free Kindergar- 
ten, 1726 Columbia avenue. Edith D. Sur- 
bey, Director. 

No. 3. Mary Turner Cooper Free Kindergarten (col- 
ored), No. 957 W. Walnut street. Anna L. 
Fern, Director. 

No. 4. Wisconsin Street Free Kindergarten, No. 141 
Wisconsin street. Alma Mae Beckman, Di- 
rector. 

No. 5. East Washington Street Free Kindergarten, No. 
611 East Washington street. Iva Jordan, 
Director. 

No. 6. Mayer Free Kindergarten, corner of West and 
Norwood streets, in Mayer Chapel. Helen 
Wallick, Director. 

No. 7. Jackson Kindergarten and Model School, William 
N. Jackson Memorial Building, corner Ala- 
bama and Twenty-third streets, a part of 
Teachers College of Indianapolis. Grace M. 
Nourse and Edith D. Wachtstetter, Associate 
Directors. 

Gertrude Hinson — Assistant in Model School. 
Margaret Jones — Assistant in Jackson Kinder- 
garten. 

No. 8. Orphan Asylum Kindergarten, corner of Wash- 
ington street and Garfield Place. Martha S. 
Carey, Director. 

No. 9. City Hospital Kindergarten. Director to be sup- 
plied. 

No. 10. Day Nursery Kindergarten, 518 W. Vermont. 
Jeannette Sternberger, Director. 

No. 11. Board of Children's Guardians Kindergarten, Ir- 
vington. Pauline Thomas, Director. 

No. 12. Nathan Morris House Kindergarten, 821 South 
Meridian street. Mary Schell, Director. 

No. 13. Brightwood Free Kindergarten, 2443 Station 
street. Marion Fitton, Director. 

23 



No. 14. Italian Kindergarten, 312 S. East street. Alice 
Puddefoot, Director. 

No. 15. Friendly Inn Kindergarten, No. 528 W. Market 
street. Elizabeth Brewster, Director. 

No. 16. Woodside Addition Kindergarten, corner South- 
eastern and Temple avenues. Opal Hawkins, 
Director. 

No. 17. North Indianapolis Kindergarten, corner Rader 
and Twenty-eighth streets. Josephine McDow- 
ell, Director. 

No. 18. Martindale Avenue Kindergarten, corner Twenty- 
fourth and Martindale avenue. Alice Buchan- 
an, Director. 

No. 19. Wilmot Street Kindergarten, No. 205 Wilmot 
street. Blanche Kirby, Director. 

No. 20. Riverside Park Kindergarten, No. 1818 Gent 
street. Pearl Burdg, Director. 

No. 21. Haughville Kindergarten, No. 594 Germania ave- 
nue. Helen Brown, Director. 

No. 22. West Indianapolis Kindergarten, No. 853 Division 
street. Helen Sumerlin, Director. 

No. 23. Columbia Avenue Kindergarten (colored), No. 
1544 Columbia avenue. Ada Morris, Director. 

No. 24. 978 W. Washington street. Dora Cordes, Di- 
rector. 

No. 25. Oxford Street Kindergarten, No. 2435 Oxford 
street. E. Delia Broyles, Director. 

No. 26. Twelfth Street Kindergarten, No. 426 W. 12th 
street. Edna Brown Fleming, Director of No 
26, and Critic of Nos. 23 and 25 Kindergar- 
tens. 

No. 27. N. E. corner of Pratt and Dorman streets. Hazel 
Lapinska, Director. 

No. 28. Fairview Settlement Kindergarten. Edith Raut. 
Director. 

No. 29. Haughville Slavic Kindergarten. Grace E. De- 
Vere, Director. 

Note — The Teachers College took the lead in the Middle 
West in the introduction of practical Domestic Training, open- 
ing its first Domestic Training School in 1889. Within the 
past eight years the same work has been made a feature of the 
city public school system of Indianapolis. Therefore, the As- 
sociation, feeling that it was no longer needed in that field, 
and that it could expend its means more wisely in other ways, 
has closed all but two Domestic Training Schools — one for the 
training of the teachers in the Teachers College, and one 
for practice in connection with Kindergarten No. 16. 



24